National School Lunch Program (NSLP)

Dietary Guidelines for Americans
http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines

National School Program
https://youtu.be/niCmFUXNtdE


WHAT IS THE NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM?

 

The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 100,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provided nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 31 million children each school day in 2012. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch Program to include reimbursement for snacks served to children in afterschool educational and enrichment programs to include children through 18 years of age. The Food and Nutrition Service administers the program at the Federal level. At the State level, the National School Lunch Program is usually administered by State education agencies, which operate the program through agreements with school food authorities.

https://www.fns.usda.gov/nslp/national-school-lunch-program-nslp

HOW DOES THE NSLP BENEFIT YOUR CHILD?

 

Our lunches are designed to meet the nutritional needs of students by following the regulations and guidelines of the USDA and National School Lunch Program. We offer tasty and delicious meals that are limited in salt, fat, and sugar content with increased amounts of vitamins and minerals. These nutritious meals help your child become healthier, and are known to help improve social behaviors and academic performance.

Nutrition and Fitness

 

The winning recipe for a healthy lifestyle includes a combination of both good nutrition and physical activity. Your body needs a variety of nutrient rich foods to grow and prevent illness. And your body also needs to move and exercise every day.

Key things you need to know about leading a healthy lifestyle are:

  • Eat a healthy diet that includes fruits, vegetables and whole grain products

  • Control portion sizes and never "supersize"

  • Get active for at least 60 minutes, five times a week for ages 6-18

  • Avoid tobacco and illegal drugs all together

  • Well-nourished students have higher test scores, increased school attendance, improved concentration, and improved classroom behavior.

Students, who are physically fit, sleep better and are better able to handle the physical and emotional challenges that they encounter during the day.

 
Sports Nutrition

 

School aged athletes need to energize their bodies with good nutrition if they hope to perform their at their best. Whether it's playing football, swimming or jogging, athletes need to eat a nutritious, balanced diet to fuel their body. Good nutrition, like any sporting event, has basic ground rules and nothing affects your ability to compete more than good nutrition.

Eating the right foods helps you stay physically fit and reach your optimum performance. To reach your highest potential and maintain a winning edge, all of your body systems must be perfectly tuned using proper nutrition.

Eat a variety of Healthy Foods and stay Hydrated. The young bodies of student athletes are still growing. It is important to nourish that growth and fuel the demands of strenuous exercise and organized sports.

That translates into eating a variety of foods every day - grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, lean meats, and low fat dairy products. The base of the diet should come from carbohydrates in the form of starches and sugars. Fluids, especially water, are also important to the winning combination. Dehydration can stop even the finest athlete from playing his or her best game.

  • Eat enough Protein, Vitamins, Minerals and Fiber.
     

  • Choose lots of brightly colored Fruits and Vegetables.
     

  • Get plenty of Calcium. Calcium helps build healthy bones.
     

  • Iron is important. Iron helps carry oxygen throughout the body. Iron-rich foods include red meat, chicken, tuna, salmon, eggs, dried fruits, leafy green vegetables, and whole grains.
     

  • Protein for strength. Protein can help build muscles, along with regular training and exercise. Protein-rich foods include fish, lean red meat and poultry, dairy products, nuts, soy products, and peanut butter.
     

  • Smart Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates or "carbs" provide energy for the body and are an important source of fuel for young athletics. However, there is no need for "carb loading" before a big game. Choose carbohydrates in whole-grain foods that are less processed and high in fiber, like pasta, brown rice, whole-grain bread, and cereal. Fiber also helps lower cholesterol and may help prevent diabetes and heart disease.
     

  • Water, and staying properly hydrated, is key to an athlete’s success.

Without the right foods, even physical conditioning and expert coaching aren't enough to push you to be your best.Good nutrition must be a key part of your training program for you to succeed.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Non Discrimination Statement

 

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

Mail:

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture
O
ffice of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
 

Fax:  (202) 690-7442
 

E-mail:  program.intake@usda.gov.

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